The John Lennon Wall is one of Prague’s top sights. Even in the dead of winter, tourists flock to it to photograph themselves standing in front of the colorful graffiti. In the summer, everyone wants to add their own contribution to the wall, which has led to it being repainted white periodically. This is oddly reminiscent of the communist era. Originally, the wall was an important protest against the regime. The music of John Lennon and of The Beatles was forbidden in communist Czechoslovakia, but it was smuggled into the country (along with other Western music) and made a huge impact. The Beatles were very popular in Czechoslovakia, as indeed they still are, and the fact that their music wasRead more.

On January 21, 2017 from 12pm to 2pm, a crowd gathered around a podium in Prague’s Wenceslaus Square for the Prague Solidarity Rally with the Women’s March on Washington. Flanked by Czech police standing as silent and statuesque as the monument of St. Wenceslas behind the podium, at least 600 people, according to the Facebook event page, listened and cheered as a plethora of impassioned speakers and translators spoke-side-by-side in English and Czech, and Czech and English. Despite the inauguration of United States President Donald J. Trump the day before, the rally didn’t go as one might have expected, especially in Prague, the protest capitol of the world. Czechs, also known as Bohemians and Moravians in English, have an almostRead more.