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‘If a future generation asks us we are fighting for, we shall tell them the story of Lidice,’ said Frank Knox, secretary of the U.S. Navy, during World War II. The small and lovely town of Lidice, located 20 kilometers from Prague, suffered a brutal massacre when Hitler ordered to murder all men in the village and send women to the concentration camps. Children were carefully evaluated for “Germanization” suitability and were either sent to the camps or to the SS families. Since World War II, the village remains one of the symbols of Fascist despotism.  The history of Lidice dates back to 1318 when it was first mentioned in the writings. It was a city of miners and factoryRead more.

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The Charles Bridge in Prague is a celebrity in its own right. An iconic part of the city’s landscape, it has been a star in international movies, the location for many photoshoots, and it is an absolute must-see sight for tourists. However, the Charles Bridge is a relatively modern addition to Prague compared to the city’s history. Considering that the Prague Castle was built in the 9th century, the Charles Bridges’ 1357 birth year means that Prague was without it for almost as long as it has existed. So, what came before the Charles Bridge? Before the Charles Bridge, there was the Judith Bridge. Named after King Vladislav II’s wife, Queen Judith, the Judith Bridge was built in the 12thRead more.

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Following World War II, Czechoslovakia was attempting to regain composure in a latterly chaotic world. Edvard Beneš returned from his exile in London and became the new Czechoslovakian President. In order to hold the majority in the government, President Beneš created a coalition of multiple political parties, one of which was the Communist Party. The president himself was a member of the National Socialist Party, one of the other parties within his coalition. A government formed with positive intentions soon spiraled into a series of events that led to four decades of Communist rule for the people of Czechoslovakia. The skeptical post-war United States government grew concerned about the potential Soviet influence over the Czechoslovakian nation, and their decision toRead more.