If you’re one of the estimated 600,000 expats living in the Czech Republic, it may have occurred to you at some point to consider starting a business. Maybe you were thinking about a favorite item from home that you’ve never seen here (or had to pay hundreds of dollars to import!) Maybe there is a kind of food you miss that you’ve searched endlessly for at the various pre-Covid Food Festivals in Prague. Or maybe you have a skill to offer that you think might have value in your community… whatever the case may be, if you’ve given it any amount of thought you may have wondered, “can an expat even have a business in the Czech Republic?” A quickRead more.

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Today, the Czech Republic more or less has the same bustling consumer markets that everyone else has. But when the Czech Republic was Czechoslovakia, existing in the economic isolation of a communist regime, there wasn’t a whole lot of selection at the local stores. But there was Tuzex. Wanting to throw people a bone, the Czechoslovak government introduced the Tuzex shops; A state-run chain of shops where foreign products like booze, cigarettes, vinyls, jeans, and anything else you couldn’t find in the domestic markets. The communists kind of shot themselves in the foot on that one, because the shops’ products revealed how much better everything was outside of the castle walls, discrediting their narrative about equality and class; Czechs started seeingRead more.

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The foundation of Telč is based on a legend, which was told more than 900 years ago, in 1099. According to it, the city’s establishment is linked with the victory of the Moravian Prince Otto II over the Czech prince Břetislav. The city is situated between Prague and Vienna. Most people believe that it was the winner who built a chapel, which later became part of the famous church. In the 13th century, the original royal fortress was built on the trade routes’ crossroads; it was the historic core of the city. Only in the second half of the 16th century, the town started to expand – the castle was reconstructed with enclosed ponds and gates by architect B. MaggiRead more.