Sticky

Following World War II, Czechoslovakia was attempting to regain composure in a latterly chaotic world. Edvard Beneš returned from his exile in London and became the new Czechoslovakian President. In order to hold the majority in the government, President Beneš created a coalition of multiple political parties, one of which was the Communist Party. The president himself was a member of the National Socialist Party, one of the other parties within his coalition. A government formed with positive intentions soon spiraled into a series of events that led to four decades of Communist rule for the people of Czechoslovakia. The skeptical post-war United States government grew concerned about the potential Soviet influence over the Czechoslovakian nation, and their decision toRead more.

Sticky

Today, the Czech Republic more or less has the same bustling consumer markets that everyone else has. But when the Czech Republic was Czechoslovakia, existing in the economic isolation of a communist regime, there wasn’t a whole lot of selection at the local stores. But there was Tuzex. Wanting to throw people a bone, the Czechoslovak government introduced the Tuzex shops; A state-run chain of shops where foreign products like booze, cigarettes, vinyls, jeans, and anything else you couldn’t find in the domestic markets. The communists kind of shot themselves in the foot on that one, because the shops’ products revealed how much better everything was outside of the castle walls, discrediting their narrative about equality and class; Czechs started seeingRead more.

Sticky

Last week, you were able to read the story of St. Wenceslas, found out more about his role in Czech history and his death, allegedly suffered at his own brother’s hand. Today, I would like to share with you that it was not the first instance of a “family murder” in the Přemyslid dynasty. The sources tell us that duke Vratislaus I, the founder of the Polish city Wroclaw and the St. George Basilica at Prague castle, married the princess of Polabian Slavs, Drahomira, (the Czech historical version of Cersei) somewhere around 906. Together, they had 7 children, three of whom were sons – including Wenceslas and Boleslaus. Mother of Vratislaus, Liudmila, actively participated not only in the country’s politicsRead more.