St. Vitus’ Cathedral This truly striking piece of architecture, similar to Notre Dame in Paris, is the work of centuries. It began as a chapel, and gradually grew to the soaring edifice so often photographed today. The full name of the cathedral is an impressive one: The Metropolitan Cathedral of Saints Vitus, Wenceslas, and Adalbert. In keeping with its hefty title, it is the largest cathedral in the Czech Republic. It was established by the legendary Wenceslas (Vaclav) I of Bohemia, the murdered duke who was the inspiration for the 19th-century Christmas carol “Good King Wenceslas”. In the beginning, the cathedral was a small Romanesque rotunda dedicated to St. Vitus. Prague itself was only a very small settlement in theRead more.

A Cubist Cafe in Prague? Yes. Are you an architecture-junkie? Let me give you a hit and turn your attention towards The Madonna House (also known as “The House of the Black Mother”, or “U Černé Matky Boží” in Czech). Luckily for us, it’s located right in the heart of Prague’s Old Town and is noted as the only surviving Cubist interior in the world. Josef Gočár was only 31 years old when he designed the building in 1911 which originally was supposed to be a department store. With angular windows and its unique balconies, it symbolizes the Czech contribution to the cubist movement in its entirety. This building was open for ten years until it shut down due toRead more.

Named for the house sign that protrudes from its corner, the House at the Stone Bell was constructed in the middle of the 13th century and is the oldest gothic house in Prague. For over one hundred years, the structure sported a baroque facade, much like the other buildings on the square. Then, while undergoing restoration in the 1960s, workers discovered the original sand-color stones beneath the stucco facade and an intensive face-lift was begun. The House is now given over to excellent temporary art shows mounted by the Prague City Gallery. View on Google Maps No related posts.Read more.