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The Czech Republic has quite a few funny, entertaining, or even historically significant cartoons that might be of interest of you. Take a look at our list of the most famous Czech cartoons you should consider introducing your child to! Krtek One of the most popular Сzech cartoons is Krtek, The Little Mole. It was created by a talented Zdeněk Miler and premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 1957. The first episode was awarded two Golden Lions. The mole became a recognizable character not only in the Czech Republic but also around the globe. If you stroll around Prague, you might notice plenty of toys, games, and presents with sweet Krtek. The cartoon has almost no sound, which allows forRead more.

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One of the places that is incredibly popular in Prague is the Lennon Wall. In fact, J. Lennon never visited Prague and still became the symbol of one of its greatest landmarks. The story of the Lennon Wall started in the 1980s when a few artists used lyrics from the Beatles’ songs that emphasize today’s issues. Initially, the wall was decorated with love poems that contained small yet meaningful messages about the regime of the 1960s. During these times, the wall was also known as the “Crying Wall” since it was representing the frustration people felt with Communism and the life under the regime.  Sign of freedom and peace When John Lennon got murdered, the wall quickly became a sign ofRead more.

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The term robot is the one used fairly often in today’s science fiction, researches, and Hollywood movies. What might surprise you, however, is that this term was created by a Czech writer, Karel Čapek. Čapek became famous for his science fiction literature, especially War with the Newts (1936), and was nominated for the Nobel Prize seven times (yet, unfortunately, never received it.) During his teenage years, Čapek was interested in different things – starting from Cubism (that had a vast influence on his writing), ending with aesthetics and philosophy. His career as a journalist started with Národní listy, where he worked as an editor with his brother for four years. Afterward, Karel joined the other publishing newspaper, Lidové noviny, whereRead more.